felt events

.

a meditation on two events per day:

“Deleuze and Guattari, following Bergson, suggest that the virtual is the mode of reality implicated in the emergence of new potentials. In other words, its reality is the reality of change: the event” (Massumi, Sensing the Virtual, Building the Insensible)

[records] Seoul Decadence - Live

okinokin:

<서울 데카당스-Live> 공연 기록.
<Seoul Decadence-Live>, performance, 2014

// Link // Festival Bo:m 2014 
http://festivalbom.org/live-seoul-decadence-live

image

<Seoul Decadence-Live> is a mirrored version of Cort Guitar workers’ play entitled ‘9-day Hamlet’. The workers have been struggling against…

Cellist Okkyung Lee (b. 1975), one of three cello solo performances at an abandoned rice mill in Yangji-ri Village in the #dmz border area in Cheorwan.  #realdmzproject #artsonje

Cellist Okkyung Lee (b. 1975), one of three cello solo performances at an abandoned rice mill in Yangji-ri Village in the #dmz border area in Cheorwan. #realdmzproject #artsonje

What My Grandmother Learned (Not to Say)

thisisnotjapan:

by Akemi Johnson-

Photo: The author’s grandmother (bottom left) in her high school senior yearbook. Canal High School, 1943, Gila River incarceration camp. 

Last month, TheAtlantic.com published the essay “What My Grandmother Learned in Her World War II Internment Camp,” by Helen Yoshida. In it she tells the story of her grandmother, who was one of the 120,000 Japanese Americans imprisoned by the U.S. government from 1942 to 1945. At Heart Mountain incarceration camp, Yoshida writes, her grandmother made the best of the situation by developing the sewing skills that later enabled her “to craft a comfortable life.”

“Like many internees, she did not talk about camp later in her life. Instead, she closed that chapter,” Yoshida explains. Later in the essay, she states her grandmother did tell her about the incarceration, but “did not dwell on the racism and mass hysteria that had driven her there.” Instead, she recounted the everyday: “how she’d spent the time.”

The Nisei (second-generation Japanese American) incarceration experience has been largely characterized by silence. Among a group of Sansei (third-generation Japanese Americans) studied by psychology professor Donna K. Nagata, about three-quarters said their parents rarely or never mentioned that period. Children and grandchildren may have heard about the mundane — the everyday — but not the psychology and emotions.  

Today, with the Nisei generation departing, many of us are left on our own to interpret these silences in our families.    

My late grandmother was incarcerated during the war. She, her parents, and younger sisters were forced to abandon their home in Winters, California and bring only what they could carry to Gila River incarceration camp, in the Arizona desert. Fifty miles south of Phoenix, the camp was in a desolate area where summer temperatures soared over 100 degrees. The some 13,000 inmates lived one family per room in crude barracks — tar-papered, uninsulated, furnished with army cots, and susceptible to the dust and wildlife of the desert. Privacy was nonexistent. A guard tower kept watch. 

Like Yoshida’s grandmother, mine seemed to rally and make the best of things. She threw herself into school: her high school transcript shows she was the Calendar Editor, a reporter for the school newspaper, and secretary-treasurer of the camp National Honor Society chapter. When her class of about 200 students graduated in 1943, she was the Valedictorian.

After the war, my grandmother rebuilt her life. She married and settled in Palo Alto, California. Her family managed to establish a chrysanthemum nursery there, where three generations worked side-by-side growing the big, heavy-headed flowers. The business did well enough that by the time my grandparents had three young children, they were able to buy a three-bedroom house in a neighborhood with good schools. 

Like many others, my grandmother didn’t talk about the incarceration, referring to it rarely and simply as “camp,” as if it had been a pleasant place of capture the flag and swimming lessons.  

But I don’t think that chapter ever really closed. 

Although on the surface my grandmother may have appeared to make the best of her circumstances, leaving behind the war years to carve out her own American success story, her narrative — and her silence surrounding those years — seems to me more complex and opaque.

My grandmother is remembered by her children as overwhelmed and exasperated, critical and unhappy. She suffered from bowel issues and migraines so bad they made her vomit, and she was known to fly into rages—throwing things, wielding spoons and hairbrushes. At the end of her life, my grandmother revealed to my mother that she’d always felt as if she didn’t fit in — like “a square peg in a round hole.”

Researchers have found that the trauma of the incarceration — suppressed out of shame and a community-wide effort to forget — manifested in some former internees in physical and psychological ways. They have found high rates of low-grade depression among Nisei, along with psychosomatic symptoms such as ulcers, hypertension, and migraines. 

I’ll never know for certain what role the camp played in my grandmother’s struggles. That aspect of her life is entangled with others: her individual disposition, larger structures of race and racism in the U.S., her lingering heartbreak over the man — not my grandfather — she’d fallen in love with in camp. Still, I can’t help but feel the weight of the incarceration on my family — even on me, two generations removed. I feel it on all the years, growing up, when I hated my first name and wanted to distance myself from anything Japanese. I feel it on the years I spent later, as a young adult, working to address that by immersing myself in Japan — learning the language, living there, discovering the history of World War II.

The incarceration feels implicit in my very genetic makeup. Since the war, Japanese Americans have married outside their ethnic group at the highest rate among Asian Americans. Over sixty percent of Sansei women and over fifty percent of Sansei men have outmarried. Many of us in the fourth and fifth generations are mixed — although, we’re finding, this has not necessarily translated into a lessening of our Japanese American identity. 

What is certain is that we, as a community, as a nation, have a responsibility to keep that chapter of history open. Thanks in part to the efforts of oral historians like those at DenshoGo For Broke National Education Center, and Discover Nikkei, many Japanese Americans who were incarcerated have revisited that period in their final years, sharing their stories. Others, like my grandmother, never did.

We should not read these silences in simple terms, assuming there was nothing more to say. Instead, we can choose to dig deeper. We should continue to learn about, question, and critically examine all the complex effects of that great breach of American civil liberties.

For more on this topic, see Donna K. Nagata’s “Echoes from Generation to Generation,” in Last Witnesses: Reflections on the Wartime Internment of Japanese Americansedited by Erica Harth.

  • koreaunderground:

Yoon Mee-hyang helps Korea’s World War II sex slaves tell their stories

Seoul, South Korea — Yoon Mee-hyang recalls receiving a phone call from a man who identified himself as a Japanese right-winger. He said abruptly, “I hate Korea.”
That curse “prompted me to say, ‘I love Japan,’ ” Ms. Yoon says, smiling broadly.
Yoon, representative of the Korean Council for the Women Drafted for Military Sexual Slavery by Japan, says that as Japan has shown an increasingly conservative bent, her group has gotten more harassing e-mails and phone calls like that.
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has repeatedly denied Japan’s responsibility for its use of sexual slaves during World War II. Many of the victims were Korean women.
Critics say Mr. Abe has played a leading role in glossing over Japan’s wartime history, which has aggravated relations with neighboring countries. When Yoon and elderly survivors of the brothels visited the office building of Japanese lawmakers in June, a group of Japanese protesters showered them with a barrage of abuse, even calling the victims “prostitutes.”
“That was frustrating,” Yoon concedes.
Since 1990, the Korean council has been working on exposing the sexual slavery issue to restore the dignity and rights of victims.
Historians say the number of victims ranged from tens of thousands to 200,000. As Japan was about to be defeated in 1945, the women were abandoned or killed by Japanese soldiers or in Allied bombings.

Read More: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Making-a-difference/2014/0905/Yoon-Mee-hyang-helps-Korea-s-World-War-II-sex-slaves-tell-their-stories
  • koreaunderground:

Yoon Mee-hyang helps Korea’s World War II sex slaves tell their stories

Seoul, South Korea — Yoon Mee-hyang recalls receiving a phone call from a man who identified himself as a Japanese right-winger. He said abruptly, “I hate Korea.”
That curse “prompted me to say, ‘I love Japan,’ ” Ms. Yoon says, smiling broadly.
Yoon, representative of the Korean Council for the Women Drafted for Military Sexual Slavery by Japan, says that as Japan has shown an increasingly conservative bent, her group has gotten more harassing e-mails and phone calls like that.
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has repeatedly denied Japan’s responsibility for its use of sexual slaves during World War II. Many of the victims were Korean women.
Critics say Mr. Abe has played a leading role in glossing over Japan’s wartime history, which has aggravated relations with neighboring countries. When Yoon and elderly survivors of the brothels visited the office building of Japanese lawmakers in June, a group of Japanese protesters showered them with a barrage of abuse, even calling the victims “prostitutes.”
“That was frustrating,” Yoon concedes.
Since 1990, the Korean council has been working on exposing the sexual slavery issue to restore the dignity and rights of victims.
Historians say the number of victims ranged from tens of thousands to 200,000. As Japan was about to be defeated in 1945, the women were abandoned or killed by Japanese soldiers or in Allied bombings.

Read More: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Making-a-difference/2014/0905/Yoon-Mee-hyang-helps-Korea-s-World-War-II-sex-slaves-tell-their-stories
  • koreaunderground:

Yoon Mee-hyang helps Korea’s World War II sex slaves tell their stories

Seoul, South Korea — Yoon Mee-hyang recalls receiving a phone call from a man who identified himself as a Japanese right-winger. He said abruptly, “I hate Korea.”
That curse “prompted me to say, ‘I love Japan,’ ” Ms. Yoon says, smiling broadly.
Yoon, representative of the Korean Council for the Women Drafted for Military Sexual Slavery by Japan, says that as Japan has shown an increasingly conservative bent, her group has gotten more harassing e-mails and phone calls like that.
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has repeatedly denied Japan’s responsibility for its use of sexual slaves during World War II. Many of the victims were Korean women.
Critics say Mr. Abe has played a leading role in glossing over Japan’s wartime history, which has aggravated relations with neighboring countries. When Yoon and elderly survivors of the brothels visited the office building of Japanese lawmakers in June, a group of Japanese protesters showered them with a barrage of abuse, even calling the victims “prostitutes.”
“That was frustrating,” Yoon concedes.
Since 1990, the Korean council has been working on exposing the sexual slavery issue to restore the dignity and rights of victims.
Historians say the number of victims ranged from tens of thousands to 200,000. As Japan was about to be defeated in 1945, the women were abandoned or killed by Japanese soldiers or in Allied bombings.

Read More: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Making-a-difference/2014/0905/Yoon-Mee-hyang-helps-Korea-s-World-War-II-sex-slaves-tell-their-stories

koreaunderground:

Yoon Mee-hyang recalls receiving a phone call from a man who identified himself as a Japanese right-winger. He said abruptly, “I hate Korea.”

That curse “prompted me to say, ‘I love Japan,’ ” Ms. Yoon says, smiling broadly.

Yoon, representative of the Korean Council for the Women Drafted for Military Sexual Slavery by Japan, says that as Japan has shown an increasingly conservative bent, her group has gotten more harassing e-mails and phone calls like that.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has repeatedly denied Japan’s responsibility for its use of sexual slaves during World War II. Many of the victims were Korean women.

Critics say Mr. Abe has played a leading role in glossing over Japan’s wartime history, which has aggravated relations with neighboring countries. When Yoon and elderly survivors of the brothels visited the office building of Japanese lawmakers in June, a group of Japanese protesters showered them with a barrage of abuse, even calling the victims “prostitutes.”

“That was frustrating,” Yoon concedes.

Since 1990, the Korean council has been working on exposing the sexual slavery issue to restore the dignity and rights of victims.

Historians say the number of victims ranged from tens of thousands to 200,000. As Japan was about to be defeated in 1945, the women were abandoned or killed by Japanese soldiers or in Allied bombings.

Read More: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Making-a-difference/2014/0905/Yoon-Mee-hyang-helps-Korea-s-World-War-II-sex-slaves-tell-their-stories

And so #chuseok begins with #realdmzproject 2014 special tour.  Yangji-ri Village (above). JaeEun Choi (b.1953) No Borders Exist in Nature, neon, Woljeong-ri Station (below).

And so #chuseok begins with #realdmzproject 2014 special tour. Yangji-ri Village (above). JaeEun Choi (b.1953) No Borders Exist in Nature, neon, Woljeong-ri Station (below).

"The door is closed. There is a black woman at the front of the room, near the blackboard. She is facing a black man who is sitting down and talking fast. He keeps talking for a long time, as if he has been waiting a while to say this to someone. The police, but not only the police, treated him like he was a criminal. His parents, who are white, didn’t believe him when he told them this, or if they wanted to believe him, they still just didn’t know what to say. Why would they? They were adopting a black child, they thought—not a black teenager, not a black man."
Black Kids in White Houses by Jen Graves (via brandx)
"

We had a lot of trouble with Western mental health workers who came here immediately after the genocide and we had to ask some of them to leave.

They came and their practice did not involve being outside in the sun where you begin to feel better. There was no music or drumming to get your blood flowing again. There was no sense that everyone had taken the day off so that the entire community could come together to try to lift you up and bring you back to joy. There was no acknowledgement of the depression as something invasive and external that could actually be cast out again.

Instead they would take people one at a time into these dingy little rooms and have them sit around for an hour or so and talk about bad things that had happened to them. We had to ask them to leave.

"
~A Rwandan talking to a Western writer, Andrew Solomon, about his experience with depression and Western mental health.

From The Moth podcast, ‘Notes on an Exorcism’. (via jacobwren)

UIUC Philosophy Dept Condemns #Salaita Firing

palumboliu:

The Department of Philosophy at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign today (August 28) approved the following resolution:
Whereas the recent words and actions of Chancellor Phyllis Wise, President Robert Easter, and the Board of Trustees in connection with the revocation of an offer…

fuckinginbrooklyn:

25K retweets and I’ve lost count of how many death threats. Keep reposting. #Ferguson #Racism #Progress

Where Palestine and Pontecorvo meet

arabious:

In May 1989, Edward Said arrived at the Rome apartment of Gillo Pontecorvo, eager to press the Italian filmmaker on the connections between The Battle of Algiers and the First Intifada that was then raging in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. In his account of the interview, Said presents the discussion of these connections as the climax of his conversation with Pontecorvo: “Finally…I was able to get to what seemed to me to be the logical contemporary extension of the political situations represented in The Battle of Algiers”.

In his eagerness to relate Pontecorvo’s 1966 masterpiece to Palestine, Said was voicing a much wider fascination among both Palestinians and Israelis with establishing the film’s relevance (or irrelevance) to the contemporary Middle East. The potential parallels are there for all to see. From the brutality of France’s colonial occupation (complete with checkpoints, house demolitions and separation barriers), to the FLN’s targeting of civilians and urban warfare tactics, The Battle of Algiers seems to invite comparison with Israel’s on-going military occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip.

Read more at openDemocracy.

After A Traffic Stop, Teen Was 'Almost Another Dead Black Male' : NPR

peaceshannon:

THIS. this is exactly why white parents of children of color can NOT pretend that racism doesn’t exist. it is your job to understand and prepare your child for the racism they WILL face and you will need help from a larger community that actually has experienced that racism, which is why you are irresponsible if you have made no efforts to connect your child with their ethnic community:

"Still, "we never talked about race growing up," Landau tells his mother, Patsy Hathaway, on a visit to StoryCorps. "I just don’t think that was ever a conversation."

"I thought that love would conquer all and skin color really didn’t matter," Hathaway says. "I had to learn the really hard way when they almost killed you."

That was in 2009, when Landau, then a college student, was stopped by Denver police officers and severely beaten.”

"A book is made from a tree. It is an assemblage of flat, flexible parts (still called “leaves”) imprinted with dark pigmented squiggles. One glance at it and you hear the voice of another person, perhaps someone dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, the author is speaking, clearly and silently, inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people, citizens of distant epochs, who never knew one another. Books break the shackles of time, proof that humans can work magic."
Carl Sagan (via zeldawilliams)